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buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, david ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many of which have been intercepted by the ir
-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. th
, and also said-- i'm not sure the exact word he used-- but basically no top vent intelligence was revealed. >> i think he made a point of saying so far. and so far, there is not any negative effect on national security. but this investigation is clearly still open. you have hagents going into paula broadwell's house, taking out boxes, taking out her computer. they are still looking for classified material. whatever too soon maybe it was something for the book. maybe it's a schedule that's classified. you know how this works. everything in the military is practically classified including weather reports. i've sat through briefings and it's classified. in terms of it being illegal, if she has classified material in her home, it is illegal. now, she had a clearance. she could read classified material, but not in her home. they've now yanked her security clearance we just learned this evening while this investigation continues. but she shouldn't have had classified material. i think what they're talking about is in terms of so far, they haven't seen, you know, pillow talk i guess is what you c
that they must avoid what has come to be known as the dreaded fiscal cliff, the congressional leaders used the world "constructive" once each to describe today's white house meeting and the white house used it twice in its official statement. so did we see any real movement today or was it all just rhetoric, david? >> well, i think the first thing we saw is that the two sides have agreed it's in their interests to agree reasonable. during the campaign, everybody wanted to be resolute in their position. now we're in the appearing reasonable thing. secondly, as we saw mitch mcconnell say, the republicans have conceded that taxes are going to go up. there remains this huge issue which was not as far as we could tell resolved or discussed today, is the president going to insist on raising tax rates on the rich, or will he come up with some other way to get money out of rich people that the republicans find more palatable, perhaps by limiting deductions or something. gwen: today, i flash back to the previous conversations, helene, in which everyone comes out at separate microphones and they're
term, "tampa socialite." general allen is in charge of the fate of 82,000 u.s. troops. ofi don't know the content those are, how many came from him, i don't know those things but we don't know the nature of that relationship. quite a different relationship between allen and joe kelly and petraeus and broadwell -- and jill kelley and petraeus and broadwell. >> why didn't the justice department tell the white house what was going on? >> if they had, we would be screaming cover-up at the white house. damned if you do, damned if you don't. one of the things that griffin bell and sisson, is that he be told when high-level people were under investigation but not tell the president. it would compromise the investigation -- >> there was an election going on. >> there was, and i agree with nina. you have to be careful that you don't put yourself in the position of the cover-up. what is conduct that is worthy of blackmail? the director of national intelligence, what we all say it is. petraeus could be blackmailed by it and fired by it -- >> the fbi agent thought he was doing his duty. >> he is
to the united nations for the u.s. she has not yet been officially nominated for the state department job to replace hillary clinton who intends to resign probably. rice is rumored to be underactive and positive consideration. but republicans and some democrats have been angry with ms. rice for saying that the attack in benghazi that left four americans dead was spontaneous and not preplanned. >> what our assessment is as of the present is, in fact, it began spontaneously in benghazi as a reaction to what had transpired some hours earlier in cairo where, of course, as you know, there was a violent protest outside of our embassy, sparked by this hateful video. we do not have information at present that leads to us conclude that this was premeditated or preplanned. >> ms. rice made these comments five days after intelligence reports were reporting otherwise. be that as it may, at his press conference on wednesday of this week, president obama voiced outrage with senators mccain and graham. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then th
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)